Arches of the Foot

The bones of the foot are arranged in three arches two longitudinal (medial and lateral) arches and one anterior transverse arch that is supported by ligaments and tendons.

-These make the foot to support the weight of the body, by the distribution of body weight over the soft and hard tissues of the foot.

These are not rigid, they spring back when the weight is lifted, these arches are developed by the age of 12 or 13.

The 2 longitudinal arch consist of tarsal and metatarsal bones arranged to form an arch from the anterior to the posterior part of the foot.

The medial longitudinal arch originates at the calcaneus, rises to the talus and descends through the navicular, the three cuneiforms, and the heads of the three medial metatarsals. This is so high, so the middle part of the foot is not touching the ground.

The lateral longitudinal arch also begins at the calcaneus. It rises at the cuboid and descends to the heads of the two lateral metatarsals.

The transverse arch is found between the medial and lateral aspects of the foot and is formed by the navicular, three cuneiforms, and the bases of the five metatarsals.

-The padded portion of the sole superficial to the heads of the metatarsals foot carries about 40% of the weight and the heel carries about 60%.

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